Science education in the age of Industry 4.0: challenges to economic ­development and human capital growth in Ukraine

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Authors:

S.Dovgyi, Acad. of the NAS of Ukraine, Dr. Sc. (Phys.-Math.), Prof., Junior Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

V.Nebrat, Dr. Sc.(Econ.), Senior Research Fellow, orcid.org/0000-0002-5419-3181, Institute for Economics and Forecasting of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

D.Svyrydenko, Dr. Sc. (Philos.), Assoc. Prof., orcid.org/0000-0001-6126-1747, National Pedagogical Dragomanov University, Kyiv, Ukraine, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

S.Babiichuk, Cand. Sc. (Ped.), orcid.org/0000-0001-6556-9351, National Pedagogical Dragomanov University, Kyiv, Ukraine, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Naukovyi Visnyk Natsionalnoho Hirnychoho Universytetu. 2020, (1):146-151
https://doi.org/10.33271/nvngu/2020-1/146

 повний текст / full article



Abstract:

Purpose. To summarize the experience of implementation of science education approaches in Ukraine, which takes into account the need to overcome the crisis in modern economy, in particular, as to the conformance of current system of specialists’ training in Ukraine to the world trends conceptualized in theoretical provisions of the Industry 4.0 concept.

Methodology. Given the economic slowdown in Ukraine, the authors proposed to verify the potential of science education as a strategy of modernization of education to ensure its role in the formation of the 21st-century skills. Based on the correlation between the demand for the development of the 21st-century skills under modern economic conditions and the capabilities of science education as a recognized modern educational strategy, the authors sought to substantiate the responses to the challenges of economic and human capital development in Ukraine. Theoretical (analysis, synthesis, systematization, generalization) and empirical (observation, comparison) research methods are used.

Findings. The analysis of negative trends in the domestic economy (indicators of human capital development, global competitiveness, and others) made it possible to prove the idea that contemporary national education has low institutional capacity to provide an adequate response to the complex challenges of Industry 4.0 economy. The analysis of Ukrainian experience in the implementation of science education showed a beneficial effect of dissemination of modern educational practices that are closely intertwined with the modern trends in economics and management.

Originality. The approach was justified according to which the dissemination of science education ideas is one of the strategies for reorienting the Ukrainian system of future personnel training for modern global labor market, science-based and technologically rich agenda for the development of mankind, proposed by the Industry 4.0 concept.

Practical value. There were demonstrated practical examples of implementating science education approaches, their focus on the development of the 21st-century skills and on the inclusion in the modern economic processes. This study demonstrated not only a pragmatic estimation of the need for transformation of education following the principles of science education (in alignment with labor market demands, and so on), but also showed the potential of science education in the context of providing learners with real-life tools for active citizenship, helping them to become active participants of socioeconomic and socio-cultural transformations in the age of Industry 4.0.

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ISSN (print) 2071-2227,
ISSN (online) 2223-2362.
Journal was registered by Ministry of Justice of Ukraine.
Registration number КВ No.17742-6592PR dated April 27, 2011.

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