Regional features of Ukrainian higher education in wartime conditions

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Authors:


K.I.Levchuk, orcid.org/0000-0003-0459-622X, Vinnytsia National Agrarian University, Vinnytsia, Ukraine, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

O.V.Levchuk*, orcid.org/0000-0001-5046-2367, Vinnytsia National Agrarian University, Vinnytsia, Ukraine, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

L.P.Husak, orcid.org/0000-0002-0022-9644, Vinnytsia Institute of Trade and Economics, State University of Trade and Economics, Vinnytsia, Ukraine, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

N.M.Havryliuk, orcid.org/0000-0002-6031-7777, Vinnytsia Institute of Trade and Economics, State University of Trade and Economics, Vinnytsia, Ukraine, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

O.M.Lozovskyi, orcid.org/0000-0002-9979-6832, Vinnytsia Institute of Trade and Economics, State University of Trade and Economics, Vinnytsia, Ukraine, e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

* Corresponding author e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


повний текст / full article



Naukovyi Visnyk Natsionalnoho Hirnychoho Universytetu. 2024, (1): 185 - 190

https://doi.org/10.33271/nvngu/2024-1/185



Abstract:



Purpose.
To describe the regional organizational features of educational services proposed by higher educational institutions (HEIs) of Ukraine in wartime.


Methodology.
Normative documents regulating the educational process in Ukraine in wartime conditions were analyzed. Observations, interviews, online surveys, and questionnaires followed by mathematical and statistical analysis constituted the empirical basis of the research. The selection of respondents was carried out in HEIs which are not located in the zones of active hostilities or in the immediate vicinity of them.


Findings.
Since the beginning of the full-scale war in Ukraine, students of higher education have had problems of an infrastructural, institutional, and personal nature. Mixed training has become the optimal form of training for HEIs which are not located in the zones of active hostilities or in the immediate vicinity of them. To ensure continuous learning, higher education institutions should offer students flexible options for education; establish communication between students and experienced and qualified teachers; guarantee access to relevant educational materials; create online learning platforms; provide students with mental health support; cooperate with other universities and educational establishments; and make any necessary adjustments to programs and services. For mixed learning formats, it is best to apply the following educational technologies: online learning platforms; virtual classrooms for lectures and group discussions; video conferencing tools; digital libraries; mobile learning software; and messengers.


Originality.
Access to high-quality educational opportunities in higher education institutions in the conditions of war in Ukraine requires the introduction of flexible forms of education. Mixed training will be effective in certain regions of the country under acceptable safety conditions.


Practical value.
Assessment of access for higher education learners to educational resources and technologies in the conditions of war in Ukraine has been performed. The effectiveness of distance education has been studied. Strategies have been developed to solve the problem of ensuring the continuity of education in active combat zones or in the immediate vicinity of them.



Keywords:
military state, higher education, mixed education

References.


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ISSN (print) 2071-2227,
ISSN (online) 2223-2362.
Journal was registered by Ministry of Justice of Ukraine.
Registration number КВ No.17742-6592PR dated April 27, 2011.

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